Belts – an Essential Part of Men’s and Women’s Wardrobe

The first tape emerged apparently later in the Bronze Age. Since its inception, throughout its existence until today belts have two basic properties. The first is pure functionality – hold clothes (mostly pants or skirts) in the desired location on the body and the other properties are aesthetic and decorative strips capabilities. At different times and in different cultures have placed more emphasis on functionality, on the decorativeness but both properties are always stood side by side next to each other.

Since its inception and throughout belts were an important part of men’s clothing. Women wore ribbons as well, but according to the current fashion with alternate periods of depression popularity ties with periods of their increased popularity. While men usually prevailed functional component (perhaps due to the fact that men have wider hips and pants so lacking natural foothold, which is held as women) in female bands always played an important role in its use as a fashion accessory.

Already the first tape from the Bronze Age were usually made from animal (probably buffalo) skin and had a brass buckle, which connected the free end of the belt. Paradoxically, today’s modern tapes are the oldest extremely similar.

Around half of the 19th century, the belts have become an essential component of military uniforms and served not only as a place for attaching sabers or swords, but mainly they became decorative and dominant feature of the uniforms. The tapes were in a contrasting color to the fabric uniforms, large and supplemented thongs over his shoulder. While in the army outfit their position was unassailable, men in civilian clothes began approximately hence prefer braces as a tool to ensure that the pants are always in place. The popularity suspenders was given by the fact that the typical trousers were then cut with substantially positioned above the waist (usually in the ring), and the location of the belt to this height is not the most convenient.

The modern period of belt begins the first world war, when millions of men fronts wore uniforms with trousers with lower waist and belt became compulsory equipment uniforms and served not only to fix the pants, but also as an element to which strapped bags hub sleeve on fire guns, bayonets, grenades and burgoynes. After returning from the war, young men who have become accustomed to the tape wore belts in civilian life. In the period between the world wars, the proportion of men who preferred belts and suspenders approximately balanced, but after World War II there was a period of significant decline braces and (almost absolute) to strengthen the popularity of bands.

Tapes are now popular and extended component and women’s wardrobe. Unlike male models that are more simple, minimalist and with minimal embellishments, women are often highly decorative ribbons and are often very strong (and sometimes even dominant) element of the overall outfit. Serves as a color supplement, they emphasize a tiny waist or create a non-violent transition between skirts or pants and blouse or shirt.

Although the tapes produced from a variety of materials, classical still are genuine animal leather and brass buckle. This belt is characterized – proper maintenance – long life, high color and shape retention and effortless elegance. Today, the most widely used material is beef or calf leather, which has almost ideal characteristics for the needs of belts. There are also tapes made of genuine crocodile, alligator, ostrich, lizard or snake skin, but those tapes are extremely expensive and due to the greater delicacy of the skin of the rare animals they hardly ensures a long service life. Fortunately, it is now possible to create a structure tapes skins of rare animals from classical cowhide and those tapes are the expert indistinguishable from the originals.

The tape is nowadays a natural part of men’s and women’s wardrobes and several high-quality tapes should not miss in any wardrobe.

We offer quality men’s and women’s belts on our site at bridgat.com.

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